Events Calendar

Oct
19
Fri
Speaker Series: Victoria Esses @ Room D-427, Marie-Victorin Building, Université de Montréal
Oct 19 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Victoria Esses @ Room D-427, Marie-Victorin Building, Université de Montréal | Montreal | Quebec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Victoria Esses (University of Western Ontario)

Media Portrayals of Refugees: Nature and Consequences

You can learn more about Professor Esses by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, October 19, 2018 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room D-427, Marie-Victorin BuildingUniversité de Montréal.

Abstract: Refugee resettlement policies and the treatment of refugees are often contentious issues involving uncertainty and unease. The media may take advantage of this uncertainty to create a crisis mentality in which refugee claimants are portrayed as “enemies at the gate” who are attempting to invade Western nations and take advantage of their generosity. Although it has been suggested that such depictions promote the dehumanization of refugees, there has been little direct evidence for this claim. In this presentation I will describe our program of research addressing this gap by using experimental methods to examine the causal effects of common media portrayals of refugees on dehumanization and its consequences. I will conclude by discussing strategies for counteracting such dehumanization.

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Nov
2
Fri
CSDC Method Workshop: Why Replications Do Not Fix the Reproducibility Crisis: A Model and Evidence from a Large-Scale Vignette Experiment @ Room C-4019, Lionel Groulx Building, Université de Montréal
Nov 2 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
CSDC Method Workshop: Why Replications Do Not Fix the Reproducibility Crisis: A Model and Evidence from a Large-Scale Vignette Experiment @ Room C-4019, Lionel Groulx Building, Université de Montréal | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic citizenship presents a methods workshop by:

Prof Dr. James Druckman (Northwestern University)

Why Replications Do Not Fix the Reproducibility Crisis: A Model and Evidence from a Large-Scale Vignette Experiment

Where and When: Friday, November 2, 2018 from 11am to 12pm. Room C-4019, Lionel Groulx Building, Université de Montréal.

More information about the workshop will be coming soon.

All are welcome!

For more information on other seminars and events by CSDC, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/events-draft/

Speaker Series: James Druckman @ Salle C-6070-9, Pavillon Lionel Groulx - Université de Montréal
Nov 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: James Druckman @ Salle C-6070-9, Pavillon Lionel Groulx - Université de Montréal | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

James Druckman (Northwestern University)

Unraveling Affective Polarization

You can learn more about Professor Druckman by clicking here.

 

Where and When: Friday, November 2, 2018 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room C-6070-9, Lionel Groulx Building, Université de Montréal.

Abstract: The American public has become increasingly affectively polarized – that is, more than ever, Republicans dislike Democrats and Democrats dislike Republicans. While this over-time trend is clear, many questions remain unanswered. If partisans go too far—and become highly uncivil—does it counteract affective polarization trends? Do people dislike the other party’s voters as much as the other party’s elites? And just how much does partisan animus spillover into everyday non-political decisions? How does this spillover compare and/or interact with racial discrimination? This talk will address each of these questions by presenting distinct studies on each.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Nov
16
Fri
Speaker Series: Elizabeth Suhay @ Room 404 - Thomson House
Nov 16 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Elizabeth Suhay @ Room 404 - Thomson House | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Elizabeth Suhay (American University)

How Americans on the Left and Right Explain Socioeconomic Inequality

You can learn more about Professor Suhay by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, November 16, 2018 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

AbstractResearchers increasingly find that Americans on the left and right disagree not only about policy prescriptions but also about politically relevant factual beliefs. In this talk, I argue that there is a stark divide between the political left and right in the U.S. with respect to causal attributions for socioeconomic inequality that is both under appreciated and under theorized. Drawing on data from two original, U.S.-representative surveys, I first discuss the relative popularity of different explanations—work ethic, innate intelligence, discrimination, structural inequalities, and group culture—for why some people and social groups have less income and wealth than others. I then show that the left (Democrats, liberals, Clinton/Sanders supporters) and right (Republicans, conservatives, Trump supporters) diverge in their acceptance of these explanations, with discrimination (favoured by the left) and work ethic (favoured by the right) standing out as most divisive. Finally, I explore whether these attributional differences are due to political ideology or coalitional differences. Some have argued that left-right attributional differences stem from fundamentally different value orientations: those on the left seek to justify social welfare by blaming society for economic inequality, whereas those on the right seek to justify limited government intervention in the economy by blaming individuals. This conclusion is premature, however, given that the marginalized groups at the center of these investigations (e.g., black Americans, women) are associated with the political left. The left may “excuse” those with fewer resources, and the right may “blame” them, due to group affinity (or lack thereof), not ideology. Therefore, I also ask participants to explain why some right-leaning groups have fallen behind relative to others: rural (vs. urban) Americans; white (vs. Asian) Americans; people in red (vs. blue) states. Does the right’s tendency to blame people for falling behind diminish when the groups in question are political and social allies? Likewise, are those on the left less sympathetic toward these groups? Such malleability would imply that causal attributions for inequality, while not necessarily insincere, are rooted more in social identities than ideology.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Dec
7
Fri
Speaker Series: Michael Bechtel @ Room 404 - Thomson House
Dec 7 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Michael Bechtel @ Room 404 - Thomson House | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Michael Bechtel (Washington University)

Inequality and Redistribution Behavior

You can learn more about Professor Bechtel by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, December 7, 2018 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

AbstractPolitical polarization and extremism are widely thought to be driven by the surge in economic inequality in many countries around the world. Understanding why inequality persists depends on knowing the causal effect of inequality on individual behavior. We study how inequality affects redistribution behavior in a randomized “give-or-take” experiment that created equality, advantageous inequality, or disadvantageous inequality between two individuals before offering one of them the opportunity to either take from or give to the other. We estimate the causal effect of inequality in representative samples of German and American citizens (N=4,966) and establish two main findings. First, individuals imperfectly equalize payoffs: On average, respondents transfer 12% of the available endowments to realize more equal wealth distributions. This means that respondents tolerate a considerable degree of inequality even in a setting in which its removal would be feasible at zero costs. Second, redistribution behavior in response to disadvantageous and advantageous inequality is largely asymmetric: Individuals who take from those that are richer do not also tend to give to those that are poorer and individuals who give to those that are poorer do not tend to take from those that are richer. These behavioral redistribution types correlate in meaningful ways with support for heavy taxes on the rich and the provision of welfare benefits for the poor. Consequently, it seems difficult to construct a majority coalition willing to back the type of government interventions needed to counter rising inequality.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
1
Fri
Speaker Series: Antje Ellermann @ Room 404 - Thomson House
Feb 1 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Antje Ellermann @ Room 404 - Thomson House | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Antje Ellermann (University of British Columbia)

Political Insulation and the Comparative Politics of immigration: A Theoretical Framework

You can learn more about Professor Ellermann by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, February 1, 2019 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

Abstract: Why do states that confront comparable immigration challenges oftentimes adopt remarkably different policy solutions? This talk presents a theoretical framework for the comparative study of immigration policy making. I argue the capacity of policy makers to turn their immigration preferences into policy is contingent on the availability of three types of political insulation. Whereas popular insulation will shield policy makers from public pressure for policy restrictionism, interest group insulation and diplomatic insulation are necessary if policy makers are to enjoy reprieve from demands by domestic lobbies and foreign governments for policy liberalization. Because each type of insulation differs across institutional arenas, immigration policy choices will vary not only across countries but, in contexts where actors can manipulate the institutional locus of policy making, also over time.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Mar
15
Fri
Speaker Series: Elisabeth Ivarsflaten @ Room 404 - Thomson House
Mar 15 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Elisabeth Ivarsflaten @ Room 404 - Thomson House | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Elisabeth Ivarsflaten (University of Bergen, Norway)

Asylum Seekers Centers in the Neighborhood: Causal Effects of Sudden Immigrant Influx on Exclusionary Attitudes

You can learn more about Professor Ivarsflaten by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, March 15, 2019 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

AbstractDuring the 2015 refugee crisis, Europe experienced a sharp rise in asylum seeker numbers. Of the approximately 1 million people who reached Europe during 2015, 31 thousand individuals made their way to its northern periphery crossing the border into Norway. In the course of one year, the Norwegian government established 259 new asylum seekers’ centers throughout the country. The establishment of these centers generated a rare opportunity to examine the causal effects of a sudden immigrant influx on intergroup attitudes in local communities. We had measured exclusionary attitudes in a panel of respondents randomly recruited from the population registry in Norway multiple times prior to the refugee crisis and we continued to measure these attitudes during and after the crisis. Consistent with theoretical expectations, the results show a clear exclusionary reaction in the population generally. However, at the local level we discovered and now document a remarkable acceptance of the asylum centers among those who received one in their neighborhood compared to those who did not.  Receiving the asylum centers in the neighborhood proved less disruptive than the local populations imagined beforehand and this led to substantial attitude change shortly after the establishment of the centers.  However, the acceptance of the centers did not generalize to more positive general attitudes towards immigration at the national level.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
12
Fri
Speaker Series: Elin Naurin @ Room 404 - Thomson House
Apr 12 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Elin Naurin @ Room 404 - Thomson House | Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Elin Naurin (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)

The Political Effects of Pregnancy

You can learn more about Professor Naurin by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, April 12, 2019 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

AbstractIt is widely believed that pregnancy and birth-giving are life-changing experiences for most women and their partners. Still, there are few systematic studies of how pregnancy and childbirth matter to the individual’s political development. In this talk, the head of the recently started Gothenburg Research Program on Pregnancy and Politics will give her first official overview of project results focusing, among other things, on the effects of pregnancy on political attentiveness and political participation. Data comes from a unique large-scale panel survey (N=60,000) where respondents who eventually become pregnant (and partners of pregnant women) are followed until a year after childbirth. Results show that pregnancy and birth-giving demobilize women to pay less attention to political information and to express lower interest in politics in general. This phenomenon lasts at least until the baby is 12 months of age, and it is not observed in male partners of pregnant women, suggesting a significant – and previously unproven – political consequence of pregnancy. Results are important as they highlight understudied biological and psychological mechanisms behind the well-known gender gap in political knowledge and efficacy. In addition, the implication is that pregnancy in itself ­­– and not only parenthood – entails a political process for the individual and should be studied as such. The talk will also include recent results on how pregnancy and early parenthood change emotions as well as policy opinions.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

May
10
Fri
Speaker Series: Eva Anduiza
May 10 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Speaker Series: Eva Anduiza @ Montréal | Québec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Eva Anduiza (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

“I am not a feminist but…” Women’s protests and gender attitudes in Spain

You can learn more about Professor Anduiza by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, May 10, 2019 from 3:00 to 5:00pm. Location TBD.

AbstractIn 2018 Spanish politics were shaken by the sudden and intense mobilization of women. The protests started in April following the announcement that five men had been absolved of sexual aggression for the gang rape of a teenager in the 2016 San Fermines bull festival, and had been found guilty only of the lesser offence of sexual abuse. On the 8th of March thousands of women took to the streets in over 120 Spanish cities against gender inequality, discrimination and sexual violence.

Social media campaigns reporting sexual harassment and abuse such as #metoo (in Spain #yotambien) had already been going on months before and continued after (#cuentalo). Political parties reacted to this issue sometimes highlighting their pre-existing feminist policy background (PSOE), discourses (Podemos), trying to incorporate a feminist touch (not always successfully) or strengthening their more conservative positions.

In this paper I want to analyze the individual consequences of these events in attitudes towards gender equality and feminist identities. Have these feminist protest events made citizens more likely to consider themselves as feminist and to support gender equality? Have they elicited a backlash reaction towards more anti-feminist positions? What is the role played by attitudinal priors, social media and celebrities that have engaged in these issues? These questions will be addressed using panel data from Spain.

The event will be live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

Learn more about our Speaker Series Events here: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).