Events Calendar

Mar
2
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Sarah Bush @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University
Mar 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Who’s There? Election Observer Identity and the Local Credibility of Elections

Sarah Bush (Temple University)

You can learn more about Professor Temple by clicking here

Abstract: Prior research has sought to understand the rise of election observers and their consequences for outcomes such as fraud, protest, and violence. These studies are important, but they overlook a significant individual-level dynamic that observers themselves care about: the effect that election observers have on local attitudes about elections. How does election observer identity affect the local credibility of elections? We argue that the activities of election observers can enhance the local credibility of elections, but only when locals perceive observers as being both capable of detecting fraud and unbiased in that pursuit. Importantly, not all observer groups are seen as equally capable and unbiased. Evidence from a large-scale, nationally-representative experiment in Tunisia supports the argument. A key finding is that observers from the Arab League—an organization criticized internationally for low-quality election observation—enhanced credibility the most as they were the observers perceived locally as both relatively capable and unbiased.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Mar
23
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Leonie Huddy @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

The Social Nature of Partisan Identity

Leonie Huddy (Stony Brook University)

You can learn more about Professor Huddy by clicking here

Abstract: There is growing evidence that partisanship is a powerful social identity in both US and Western Europe democracies. This holds both good and bad normative news. On one hand, strong partisans are defensive, conform to party norms, and dislike partisans of competing parties. On the other, they are more politically engaged and are especially likely to get involved in election campaigns working on behalf of their party. In this experimental study, we explore the conditions under which partisan animosity can be ameliorated without undermining strong partisan identities, contrasting two key approaches to the study of partisanship. From an instrumental perspective, the growing negativity between Democrats and Republicans is due to increased ideological differences between the parties. In contrast, an expressive approach attributes the origins of partisan antipathy to the protection of group status in response to partisan threats and insults (Huddy et al 2005). In the current experiment, 600 MTurk workers are exposed to information that Democrat and Republican leaders have amicable or hostile relations, and that Republicans and Democrats are in conflict or agreement over a key policy issue.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
6
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Eszter Hargittai @ Room C-2059, Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, Université de Montréal
Apr 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Social media use and political engagement

Eszter Hargittai (University of Zurich)

You can learn more about Professor Hargittai by clicking here

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
20
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Jessica Gottlieb @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University
Apr 20 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Democratic Accountability and the Informal Sector: Evidence from Senegal

Jessica Gottlieb (Texas A&M University)

You can learn more about Professor Gottlieb by clicking here

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

May
18
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Christopher Cochrane @ Ballroom, Thomson House, McGill University
May 18 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Christopher Cochrane (University of Toronto)

You can learn more about Professor Cochrane by clicking here

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

May
25
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Maarten Vink @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University
May 25 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Immigrant Naturalization in Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden: Origin, Destination and Life Course in Longitudinal Perspective (1995-2015)

Maarten Vink (Maastricht University)

You can learn more about Professor Vink by clicking here

Abstract: What is the relative influence of characteristics associated with origin country (geographical distance, human development, political regime, dual citizenship acceptance) and the migrant life course (age at migration, marital status, children) on the propensity of immigrants to naturalize, and how do these factors condition the impact of changing citizenship policies in destination countries? Despite a thriving literature on immigrant naturalization, most studies focus on origin country and individual characteristics while attention to institutional variation at the destination country level remains more limited. Data limitations have resulted in analyses that focus mostly on single destination countries and rarely capture policy change over time. This paper draws on micro-level longitudinal data from population registers in Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden from 1995 to 2015. These data allow us to track the naturalization propensity of six migrant cohorts from up to 200 origin countries over a period of fifteen years for each cohort. The longitudinal and comparative design of the study enables an analysis of the influence of changing citizenship policies, covering both major institutional changes within countries over time (restrictions in Denmark in 2002, 2006, 2008 and dual citizenship acceptance in 2014; restriction in the Netherlands in 2003; acceptance of dual citizenship in Sweden in 2001) as well as a comparison of long-term differences between these countries.

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).