Events Calendar

Oct
27
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Philipp Rehm @ Ballroom (SSMU)
Oct 27 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm
CSDC Speaker Series: Philipp Rehm @ Ballroom (SSMU)  | Montreal | Quebec | Canada

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

The past and future of welfare state politics

Philipp Rehm (Ohio State University)

You can learn more about Professor Rehm by clicking here

Abstract: In 1880, not a single country had a nationally compulsory social policy program. A few decades later, every single one of today’s rich democracies had adopted programs covering all or almost all of the main risks people face: old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment. These programs rapidly expanded in terms of range, reach, and resources. Today, all rich democracies cover all main risks for a vast majority of citizens, with binding public or mandatory private programs, though there are stark cross-national differences. The talk offers a theoretical framework centered around the distribution of risk within societies to account for this remarkable development, which also helps to shed some light on the future of welfare state politics.

Refreshments will be provided.

The talk will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Nov
8
Wed
CSDC Speaker Series: David Broockman @ Thomson House Ballroom
Nov 8 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Wealthy Elites’ Policy Preferences and Economic Inequality: The Case of Technology Entrepreneurs

David Broockman (Stanford University)

You can learn more about Professor Broockman by clicking here

Abstract: If wealthy businesspeople reliably support policies in their material self-interest, they can be expected to use their tremendous political influence to exacerbate inequality. We argue business elites in an industry can share distinctive values and predispositions which can override their self-interest. We demonstrate our argument with technology entrepreneurs, business elites with increasing wealth and political influence but who overwhelmingly support Democrats. To understand this puzzle, we conducted original surveys of elite technology entrepreneurs, elite partisan donors, and the public. We show that technology entrepreneurs’ predispositions to- ward racial tolerance, non-authoritarianism, and cosmopolitanism align them with Democrats in supporting liberal redistributive, social, and globalistic policies. However, they generally oppose regulation—but also for reasons that extend beyond self-interest alone. Our findings provide a rare window into a wealthy elite’s views that is both theoretically rich and politically relevant, providing nuance to expectations about the interplay between economic and political inequality.

 

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Dec
8
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Ryan Enos @ Thomson House #404
Dec 8 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

The Space Between Us: Social Geography and Politics

Ryan Enos (Harvard University)

You can learn more about Professor Enos by clicking here

Abstract: The Space Between Us brings the connection between geography, psychology, and politics to life. By going into the neighborhoods of real cities, Enos shows how our perceptions of racial, ethnic, and religious groups are intuitively shaped by where these groups live and interact daily. Through the lens of numerous examples across the globe and drawing on a compelling combination of research techniques including field and laboratory experiments, big data analysis, and small-scale interactions, this timely book provides a new understanding of how geography shapes politics and how members of groups think about each other. This rigorous research illuminates the profound effects of social geography on how we relate, think, and politically interact across groups in the fabric of our daily lives.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Jan
19
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Dave Karpf @ Room 624, Education building, McGill University
Jan 19 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Analytic Activism: How activist organizations refine tactics and develop strategies to build power in the digital age

Dave Karpf (George Washington University)

You can learn more about Professor Karpf by clicking here

Abstract: Organized advocacy groups are increasingly turning to digital analytics in order to gauge supporter interest, monitor public sentiment, experiment with new tactics, and craft strategies that resonate in the new media environment. The impact of digital media in the political arena occurs both through the new types of speech it supports and the new types of listening and learning that it enables. In his new book, Analytic Activism, Dave Karpf explores how digital media fits into advocacy campaigning, what it is useful for, what its limitations are, and how it is changing the political landscape in 2017 and beyond.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
9
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Marc Helbling @ Room 624, Education building, McGill University
Feb 9 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Measuring Immigration Policies and their Effects

Marc Helbling (University of Bamberg)

You can learn more about Professor Helbling by clicking here

Abstract: Despite a growing interest in migration questions, it has not been possible for a long time to systematically analyse immigration policies across time and a large number of countries. Most studies in this field have heretofore focused on individual cases or comparisons of a small number of countries. The aim of this talk is to present the Immigration Policies in Comparison (IMPIC) dataset, which proposes a new and comprehensive way to measure immigration regulations. The data set covers all major fields and dimensions of immigration policies for thirty-three OECD countries between 1980 and 2010. For the first time it will be possible to systematically investigate causes and effects of migration policies. Besides a presentation of how immigration policies have been conceptualized and measured first analyses will be presented in the talk. First it will be shown how policies evolved across time, to what extent regulations became more restrictive or liberal and whether or not they converged. Second, it will be shown how effective policies are, to what extent more restrictive policies lead to lower immigration rates and how important the effect is compared to socio-economic aspects that might attract or deter migrants.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
16
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Noam Lupu @ Room C-2059, Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, Université de Montréal
Feb 16 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Affluence and congruence

Noam Lupu (Vanderbilt University)

You can learn more about Professor Lupu by clicking here

Abstract: Do elected representatives reflect the preferences of the citizens they represent? Recent studies from the U.S. have found that elected representatives tend to be more responsive to the preferences of affluent citizens. But we still know little about why this bias exists. We examine whether a similar affluence bias exists outside the U.S. and why. We gathered every available survey of national legislators in the world and matched it with mass survey data. Using a variety of methods, we identify how closely the distribution of legislators matches that of citizens. Around the world, legislators’ preferences are consistently more congruent with those of affluent citizens. But we find no comparative evidence for any of the mechanisms proposed by studies in the U.S. There seems to be something general about modern electoral democracies that makes representatives disproportionately more congruent with the rich – but we still do not know what that something is.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Mar
2
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Sarah Bush @ Room 624, Education building, McGill University
Mar 2 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Who’s There? Election Observer Identity and the Local Credibility of Elections

Sarah Bush (Temple University)

You can learn more about Professor Temple by clicking here

Abstract: Prior research has sought to understand the rise of election observers and their consequences for outcomes such as fraud, protest, and violence. These studies are important, but they overlook a significant individual-level dynamic that observers themselves care about: the effect that election observers have on local attitudes about elections. How does election observer identity affect the local credibility of elections? We argue that the activities of election observers can enhance the local credibility of elections, but only when locals perceive observers as being both capable of detecting fraud and unbiased in that pursuit. Importantly, not all observer groups are seen as equally capable and unbiased. Evidence from a large-scale, nationally-representative experiment in Tunisia supports the argument. A key finding is that observers from the Arab League—an organization criticized internationally for low-quality election observation—enhanced credibility the most as they were the observers perceived locally as both relatively capable and unbiased.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Mar
23
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Leonie Huddy @ Room 624, Education buidling, McGill University
Mar 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

The Social Nature of Partisan Identity

Leonie Huddy (Stony Brook University)

You can learn more about Professor Huddy by clicking here

Abstract: There is growing evidence that partisanship is a powerful social identity in both US and Western Europe democracies. This holds both good and bad normative news. On one hand, strong partisans are defensive, conform to party norms, and dislike partisans of competing parties. On the other, they are more politically engaged and are especially likely to get involved in election campaigns working on behalf of their party. In this experimental study, we explore the conditions under which partisan animosity can be ameliorated without undermining strong partisan identities, contrasting two key approaches to the study of partisanship. From an instrumental perspective, the growing negativity between Democrats and Republicans is due to increased ideological differences between the parties. In contrast, an expressive approach attributes the origins of partisan antipathy to the protection of group status in response to partisan threats and insults (Huddy et al 2005). In the current experiment, 600 MTurk workers are exposed to information that Democrat and Republican leaders have amicable or hostile relations, and that Republicans and Democrats are in conflict or agreement over a key policy issue.

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
6
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Eszter Hargittai @ Room C-2059, Pavillon Lionel-Groulx, Université de Montréal
Apr 6 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Social media use and political engagement

Eszter Hargittai (University of Zurich)

You can learn more about Professor Hargittai by clicking here

This event will be livestreamed here: https://www.facebook.com/CECD.CSDC/

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
20
Fri
CSDC Speaker Series: Jessica Gottlieb @ Room TBA, McGill University
Apr 20 @ 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Democratic Accountability and the Informal Sector: Evidence from Senegal

Jessica Gottlieb (Texas A&M University)

You can learn more about Professor Gottlieb by clicking here

For more information on the CSDC speaker series, please visit: http://csdc-cecd.ca/events/csdc-speaker-series/

This series is sponsored by the Inter-university Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).