Events Calendar

Jan
30
Thu
6th Winter School on Methods @ Boardroom 406, Thomson House, McGill
Jan 30 @ 8:15 am – 5:15 pm
6th Winter School on Methods @ Boardroom 406, Thomson House, McGill

The Center for the Study of Democratic Citizenship is happy to presents:

6th Winter School on Methods

Where and when: January 30, 2020, 8:15am – 5:30pm. Boardroom 406, Thomson House, McGill.

About: This year’s edition includes courses on qualitative (NVivo) and quantitative (R) text analysis, as well as quantitative modeling (an introductory workshop, time-series cross-sectional, and multilevel modeling) in STATA and R. No prior knowledge of methods is required. One of the goals of the Winter School is to offer students an opportunity to socialise with other Centre members. This is why lunch will be provided on site and a social activity will be held on the evening of the event.

Registration: If you are interested in participating in the Winter School, please register here before January 10th, 2020! (Space will be limited. Please inform us if you would like to withdraw your registration. Registered students will receive a confirmation email by January 15th at the latest.)

Program:

  • 8 :15 Arrivée des participants | Participants’ arrival
  • 8 :30 – 10 :00 Atelier #1 | Workshop #1 : Audrey Gagnon “Qualitative text analysis in NVivo”
  • Pause | Break
  • 10 :10 – 11 :40 Atelier #2 | Workshop #2 : Alexandra Jabbour “Introducing quantitative modeling in STATA”
  • 11 :40 – 13 :00 Pause dîner | Lunch break
  • 13 :00 – 14 :15 Atelier #3 | Workshop #3: David Wuttchiet “Quantitative text analysis in R”
  • 14 :20 – 15 :50 Atelier #4 | Workshop #4 : Olivier Jacques “Time-series cross-sectional”
  • Pause | Break
  • 16 :00 – 17 :30 Atelier #5 | Workshop #5 : Jean-Philippe Gauvin “Multilevel models”
  • 19 :30 Activité sociale (à déterminer) | Social activity (TBD)

*Cet horaire est encore sujet à changement. | This schedule is still subject to change.

 

Lunch – Presentation: Essays on Multiculturalism and Secularism @ Room C-3151, Lionel-Groulx Building, Université de Montréal
Jan 30 @ 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Lunch - Presentation: Essays on Multiculturalism and Secularism @ Room C-3151, Lionel-Groulx Building, Université de Montréal

The Center for the Study of Democratic citizenship, in collaboration with Université de Montréal, the CÉRIUM and the Chaire en gestion de la diversité culturelle et religieuse, presents:

Lunch – Presentation “Essays on Multiculturalism and Secularism

Hosts: CÉRIUM and the Chaire en gestion de la diversité culturelle et religieuse

Where and when: January 30, 2020, 12pm to 2pm. Room C-3151, Lionel-Groulx Building, Université de Montréal

Registration by email until Monday, January 27th (free, lunch and free introduction of the book provided): lissa.dormoy-boulanger@umontreal.ca 

About : Discussion about political science expert Tariq Modood’s new book (University of Bristol, UK). Discussion with Valérie Amiraux (sociology, UdeM), Laurie Beaudonnet (political science, UdeM), Roxane de la Sablonnière (psychology, UdeM), Solange Lefebvre (religious studies, UdeM).

Jan
31
Fri
Speaker Series – David Fitzgerald @ Ballroom, Thomson House, McGill University
Jan 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Speaker Series - David Fitzgerald @ Ballroom, Thomson House, McGill University

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

David Fitzgerald (University of California San diego)

Refuge beyond reach: how rich democracies repel asylum seekers

You can learn more about Professor Fitzgerald by clicking here.

This event is co-sponsored with the McGill Refugee Research Group / the FRQSC research team on “Refugee protection and struggles for justice: From global to local contexts.”

Where and When: Friday, January 31, 2020  at 3:00pm. Ballroom, Thomson House, McGill University.

The presentation will be live streamed on our Youtube Channel.

Abstract: The core of the asylum regime is the principle ofnon-refoulement that prohibits governments from sending refugees back to their persecutors. Governments attempt to evade this legal obligation to which they have explicitly agreed by manipulating territoriality. A remote control strategy of “extra-territorialization” pushes border control functions hundreds or even thousands of kilometers beyond the state’s territory. Simultaneously, states restrict access to asylum and other rights enjoyed by virtue of presence on a state’s territory, by making micro-distinctions down to the meter at the border line in a process of “hyper-territorialization.” Refuge beyond Reach analyzes remote controls since the 1930s in Palestine, North America, Europe, and Australia to identify the origins of different forms of remote control, explain how they work together as a system of control, and establish the conditions that enable or constrain them in practice. It argues that foreign policy issue linkages and transnational advocacy networks promoting a humanitarian norm that is less susceptible to the legal manipulation of territoriality constrains remote controls more than the law itself. The degree of constraint varies widely by the technique of remote control. FitzGerald engages fundamental theoretical questions about the extent to which norms and institutions shape state action, the collision between sovereignty and universalist values, and the shifting articulation of governments, territories, and rights-bearing individuals.

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
7
Fri
[Method Workshop] Stan for the people – Two-day introductory workshop on Bayesian analysis and Stan
Feb 7 @ 8:30 am – Feb 8 @ 5:00 pm

The CSDC, in collaboration with the Centre for Population Dynamics (CPD), the Geographic Information Centre (GIC) and the Centre for Social and Cultural Data Science (CSCDS) presents:

Stan for the people – Two-day introductory workshop on Bayesian analysis and Stan

About: Free two-day workshop (Feb 7–8, Fri–Sat) on Bayesian analysis in Stan. Stan is a programming language that affords expression of a great variety of Bayesian statistical models, ( http://mc-stan.org/ ). The workshop will be run by Charles Margossian, a core developer of Stan from Columbia University. The workshop is targeted at graduate students and faculty who are familiar with quantitative methods (at minimum linear and logistic regression) and who want to learn more about Bayesian analysis. The first day and a half (Friday all day and Saturday morning) will focus on a general introduction to using Stan for Bayesian model estimation, while the last half-day will cover specialty or more advanced topics.

The workshop will assume a working knowledge of R and will be run in English. If you are a user of another statistical package or language, we encourage you to take an online workshop (often free: https://www.datacamp.com/courses/free-introduction-to-r) before attending. The instructor is originally from France, so he can also take questions in French.

The registration deadline is January 5th, 2020. To register, fill out the form here: https://forms.gle/DYaWTwgpiSAXvDq36

If you have questions, please contact the organizers:

Speaker Series – Jane Green @ Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM
Feb 7 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Speaker Series - Jane Green @ Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Jane Green (University of Oxford)

Testing the economic basis of populism: new insights into the economic drivers of the Brexit vote

You can learn more about Professor Green by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, February 7, 2020  at 3:00pm. Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM.

Abstract: There is a debate about the role of economic factors in explaining votes for populism versus cultural, race or immigration concerns. This presentation argues for different individual-level concepts and measures that can more directly, and relevantly, help us assess the economic basis of populism. Analysing the vote for Brexit, I will show that household income fails to capture an additional effect of wealth among higher income voters. ‘Insured’ voters, with higher property wealth, are morelikely to vote for Brexit (contrary to existing assumptions). This finding is replicated over datasets and also investigated in a survey experiment. Taking a novel conceptual turn, I further show how combining immigration and economic explanations provides new insights into the group-based economic vote for Brexit. Beliefs about racial (and geographic) relative economic gains and losses provides novel insights. This finding is also explored using US data with respect to support for Donald Trump. I will also reveal how in-work older males, and out-of-work younger males, hold perceptions of discrimination against men, and that these attitudes in turn provide a robust and additional explanation for the Brexit vote. The implications of these findings are important for how much weight we give to economic explanations for populism across cases, and how these behaviours should be theorised, measured and tested.

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
18
Tue
The mathematics of decision making: Voting Systems @ Centre de recherches mathématiques, Université de Montréal, Pavillon André-Aisenstadt, UdeM
Feb 18 @ 8:00 am – Feb 19 @ 5:00 pm
The mathematics of decision making: Voting Systems @ Centre de recherches mathématiques, Université de Montréal, Pavillon André-Aisenstadt, UdeM

The Center for the Study of Democratic citizenship, in collaboration with the Centre de Recherches Mathématiques (UdeM), presents:

The mathematics of decision making: Voting Systems

Hosts: Centre de Recherches Mathématiques

Where and when: February 18 to 19, 2020. Centre de recherches mathématiques, Université de Montréal, Pavillon André-Aisenstadt, 2920, Chemin de la tour, 5th floor.

More information available and registration link here.

About : Mathematical research on voting systems dates back to the eighteenth century work of Borda and Condorcet. Starting from the work of Arrow in the 1950’s, it has occupied a prominent role in economic theory. Much of the subsequent research in economics and political science follows the classical Arrovian tradition, using a combination of optimization methods, game theory, and axiomatic analysis to identify the normatively appealing features of different voting systems. More recently, voting systems have attracted a growing interest from researchers from computer science(particularly artificial intelligence and theoretical computer science) and operations research. What distinguishes this research is that it places significant emphasis on computational concepts and algorithmic tools to analyze voting systems. Since the ultimate goal of this research is to implement voting systems that allow people to vote electronically (like Doodle polls or online surveys) or automated systems to perform distributed decision-making, the task is to identify voting systems whose outcomes can be computed efficiently. At the same time, economists and political scientists have taken a much more positive perspective onvoting systems, increasingly using statistical techniques to analyze how different voting systems actually per-form. The goal of this research is to determine what voting systems perform best in practice, when agents(whether they be people or computer systems) are bound by cognitive and computational constraints that prevent them from fully optimizing their decisions. Currently, the most important challenge in the field is to identify voting systems that not only exhibit appealing normative properties, but also have significant practical appeal — both in terms of computational efficiency and actual performance. Ultimately, this depends on collaboration among researchers in different fields who employ different mathematical methodologies.

Feb
21
Fri
Speaker Series – John Holbein @ Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM
Feb 21 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Speaker Series - John Holbein @ Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

John Holbein (University of Virginia)

Title Coming Soon

You can learn more about Professor Holbein by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, February 21, 2020  at 3:00pm. Room C-2059, Lionel Groulx, UdeM.

Abstract: Coming soon.

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Feb
29
Sat
6th Leuven – Montréal Winter School on Elections @ Université de Montréal
Feb 29 @ 8:30 am – Mar 1 @ 5:00 pm
6th Leuven – Montréal Winter School on Elections @ Université de Montréal

The Center for the Study of Democratic Citizenship is happy to co-sponsor the event:

6th Leuven – Montréal Winter School on Elections

Hosts: Université de Montréal

Where and When: 29 February – 7 March 2020, Université de Montréal

About the event: Elections and voting behaviour are central topics in political science. This line of research calls for sophisticated research, both from a theoretical and a methodological point of view. The high-quality standards in the field imply that there is a need for specific training for PhD students working on these topics. The Leuven-Montréal Winter School addresses this need by offering a program focused on theories and methods in the study of elections and voting behaviour. The Winter School is organized jointly by the universities of Montréal and Leuven, and is based on the expertise of these universities and other well-known scholars on elections and voting behaviour.

Call for papers: please click here

For more information, please visit the website: https://soc.kuleuven.be/centre-for-political-research/events/6th-winterschool-2020 

All are welcome!

The Winter School is organized in collaboration with the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and supported by the ECPR Standing Group on Public Opinion and Voting Behaviour in a Comparative Perspective.

Mar
20
Fri
Speaker Series – Jonathan Mummolo @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University
Mar 20 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Speaker Series - Jonathan Mummolo @ Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Jonathan Mummolo (Princeton University)

The Bias is built: how administrative records mask racially biased policing

You can learn more about Professor Mummolo by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, March 20, 2020 at 3:00pm. Room 404, Thomson House, McGill University.

Abstract: Researchers often lack the necessary data to credibly estimate racial bias in policing. In particular, police administrative records lack information on civilians police observe but do not investigate. In this paper, we show that if police racially discriminate when choosing whom to investigate, analyses using administrative records to estimate racial discrimination in police behavior are statistically biased, rendering many quantities of interest unidentified—even among investigated individuals—absent strong and untestable assumptions. Using principal stratification in a causal mediation framework, we derive the exact form of the statistical bias that results from traditional estimation approaches. We develop a bias-correction procedure and nonparametric sharp bounds for race effects, replicate published findings, and show traditional estimation techniques can severely underestimate levels of racially biased policing or mask discrimination entirely. We conclude by outlining a general and feasible design for future studies that is robust to this inferential snare.

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Apr
3
Fri
Speaker Series – Sarah Hobolt @ Room TBD, Lionel Groulx Building, UdeM
Apr 3 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Speaker Series - Sarah Hobolt @ Room TBD, Lionel Groulx Building, UdeM

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship presents:

Sarah Hobolt (London School of Economics and Political Science)

Title Coming Soon

You can learn more about Professor Hobolt by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, April 3, 2020 at 3:00pm. Room TBD, Lionel Groulx Building, UdeM.

Abstract: Abstract soon. 

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).