Events Calendar

Oct
30
Fri
Perspectives on the U.S. 2020 Presidential Election
Oct 30 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Perspectives on the U.S. 2020 Presidential Election

The CSDC is happy to present:

Perspectives on the U.S. 2020 Presidential Election

Where and When: Friday, October 30, 2020 at 3:00pm on Zoom.

This roundtable is free to attend. Registration is required.
Zoom link and password will be send about 30 minutes before the start of the roundtable on October 30, 2020.

About: With only a few days left before the 2020 US election, the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship has invited a group of academic experts to comment and reflect upon the main issues at stake on November 3 based on their current research. Here are some of the topics we will discuss. The panel centers around five important themes in addition to addressing how close the presidential election and Senate races will be. First, panelists address race and ethnicity in the US presidential election, the changing electorate as well as how the protests against police violence and racial injustice relate to this election. Second, the gender gap in vote choice and masculinity in the US Presidency will also play a role in our panel, as well as the challenges and benefits of the possibility of a female VP, and women’s representation as candidates in congressional races. Third, the panel considers how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the state of the race. Fourth, our experts look at the accelerating political realignment that is taking place around intellectualism and anti-intellectualism in the US. Finally, panelists also consider the US presidential election from a Canadian perspective.

The panel will feature: 

The panel will be moderated by Dietlind Stolle (CSDC, McGill).
The roundtable will be followed by a Q&A.

ImportantWe inform you that our events are recorded and posted on our website and our social media. For the first part of the event, only the speakers and the moderator are recorded. For the questions perdio, all the participants might be visible on the recording. If you do not want to be recorded, you can 1) turn out your camera and use the audio only to ask a question, or 2) ask your question in the chat, and the moderator will ask the question for you.

Nov
5
Thu
Montreal Methods Workshop – Scott Cunningham
Nov 5 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Montreal Methods Workshop - Scott Cunningham

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, presents:

Scott Cunningham (Baylor University)

New Developments in Differences-in-Differences

You can learn more about Scott Cunningham by clicking here.

Where and When: Thursday, November 5, at 1pm on Zoom.

RSVP: please contact Costin Ciobanu at costin.ciobanu@mail.mcgill.ca 

Abstract: Historically, the differences-in-differences quasi experimental design has been one of the most if not the most popular design among all quasi-experimental papers written in economics. The most common situation has been a staggered rollout in which groups are treated at different points in time. In such situations, the panel fixed effects model with panel unit and time fixed effects (“twoway fixed effects”) has been employed because it handles such situations well. But recent work by Goodman-Bacon shows that this estimator is biased if treatment effects are dynamic. I will show the bias of OLS with twoway fixed effects under differential timing and dynamic treatment effects including a simulation that illustrates the seriousness of the bias. Time permitting, I will discuss a recent estimator by Callaway and Sant’Anna which is unbiased under the above mentioned scenario.

See more Montreal Methods Workshops events here.

Nov
13
Fri
Speaker Series – Cesi Cruz
Nov 13 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, presents:

Cesi Cruz (University of British Columbia)

Title coming soon

You can learn more about Professor Cruz by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, November 13, 2020 at 3:00pm on Zoom.

Zoom meeting: https://umontreal.zoom.us/s/95080037663

Important: We inform you that our events are recorded and posted on our website and our social media. For the first part of the event, only the speaker and the CSDC membre presenting the speaker are recorded. For the questions period, all the participants might be visible on the recording. If you do not want to be recorded, you can 1) turn out your camera and use the audio only to ask a question, or 2) ask your question in the chat, and the moderator will ask the question for you.

Abstract: Coming soon

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).

Nov
16
Mon
QPEWS – The Quebec Political Economics Webinar Series @ Zoom
Nov 16 @ 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm
QPEWS - The Quebec Political Economics Webinar Series @ Zoom

The CSDC, in collaboration with Université Laval and the department of economy at UQAM presents:

QPEWS – The Quebec Political Economics Webinar Series

The Quebec Political Economics Webinar Series (QPEWS) is a webinar series that will meet by Zoom on Mondays once every four weeks, from 1 pm to 1.45 pm (EST). The QPEWS will prioritize presentations by emergent scholars.

Organizers: Arnaud Dellis (UQAM) and Arthur Silve (ULaval)

Calendar:

More information and registration link are available here:https://sites.google.com/cornell.edu/qpews/home 

Nov
27
Fri
Speaker Series – Bart Bonikowski
Nov 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Speaker Series - Bart Bonikowski

The Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, presents:

Bart Bonikowski (New-York University)

The Partisan Sorting of ‘America’: How Nationalist Cleavages Shaped the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

You can learn more about Professor Bonikowski by clicking here.

Where and When: Friday, November 27 2020 at 3:00pm on Zoom.

Zoom meeting: https://umontreal.zoom.us/s/96259508656

Important: We inform you that our events are recorded and posted on our website and our social media. For the first part of the event, only the speaker and the CSDC membre presenting the speaker are recorded. For the questions period, all the participants might be visible on the recording. If you do not want to be recorded, you can 1) turn out your camera and use the audio only to ask a question, or 2) ask your question in the chat, and the moderator will ask the question for you.

Abstract: Political scientists have acknowledged the importance of nationalism as a constitutive element of radical-right politics, but have typically empirically reduced the phenomenon to its downstream attitudinal correlates. Sociologists, on the other hand, have extensively studied nationalism, but have only sporadically engaged in debates about institutional politics. In this study, we bring these literatures together by considering how nationalist beliefs shaped respondents’ voting preferences in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and how the election outcome built on long-term changes in the distribution of nationalism in the U.S. population. The results suggest that competing understandings of American nationhood were effectively mobilized by candidates from the two parties, both in the 2016 primaries and the general election. Furthermore, over the past twenty years, nationalism has become sorted by party, as Republican identifiers have come to define America in more exclusionary and critical terms and Democrats have increasingly endorsed inclusive and positive conceptions of nationhood. These trends point to the rising demand for radical candidates among Republicans and suggests a potentially bleak future for U.S. politics, as nationalism becomes yet another among multiple overlapping social and cultural cleavages that serve to reinforce partisan divisions and undermine the stability of liberal democratic institutions.

See all the other Speaker Series Events here.

This series is sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, which is funded by the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et culture (FRQSC).